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You are here: Home » Newsletters » Newsletter #11

Newsletter #11

publication date: Sep 28, 2012
 | 
author/source: DrB
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September Feature : Andy Affleck talks to DrB


                                                            AA





Newsletter                                                                                        September 2012


This newsletter from AtopicSkinDisease.com is sent out via email and is saved and archived on-site at http://atopicskindisease.com/categories/Newsletter. If you are a subscriber to this letter and you want to un-subscribe, please let me know. You may or may not be a member - becoming a member requires separate registration. If you wish, please try the Login to check if you are a member.  You may need to register.

AtopicSkinDisease.com aims to provide a forum for both patients and practitioners to learn more about The Combined Approach to atopic eczema. The idea is to bring together the experience of those who have atopic eczema with the expertise of those who are there to help. As an online community this site has a membership area to encourage mutual support and exchange of information and opinion. If you find the site useful please let me know, and please add your contribution wherever something catches your eye.

Membership remains free!






New articles in September

Consultant Dermatologist Andy Affleck and DrB discuss the introduction of The Combined Approach into a UK National Health Service Dermatology Clinic.

It takes four to six weeks to achieve the first two stages of healing, followed by a third stage, during which the skin becomes more stable and less reactive.

Where the Dermatology bed is next to the Psychiatry bed.

Impulse control disorder and habit disorder are the "official" terms for the the habitual scratching of chronic eczema.

As the loss of water through the skin varies according to various factors, it is best to avoid getting into a routine frequency of application.

Understanding how things affect us, and discovering what to do about it.

There is no need to feel guilty about scratching.

Atopic eczema can become chronic -  when it never clears up altogether.





Please get in touch with me whenever you like with your comments and suggestions. I look forward to members sharing information about themselves and their experience, in Member Profiles and in The Forum. The site gets bigger every month: please alert me to any difficulties with what is provided, such as broken links and videos not working!

Dr Christopher Bridgett